Since 2013

40
young women

have been trained to run school based literacy clubs in 20 schools.

In 2014

a new guidebook

used by all CODE trained teachers was translated into teachers’ first language (Kiswahili).

In 2013,

32 writers, publishers and illustrators

participated in a workshop to develop a series of non-fiction books.

Tanzania is located in Eastern Africa. Though it’s official languages are English and Kiswahili, there are more than 129 different ethnic groups in Tanzania, each with their own language. As a result, many students are taught in a language other than their mother tongue. Studies have shown that learning in mother tongue is best for children to gain literacy skills and learn other subjects in primary school (UNESCO 2008). In Tanzania, students and teachers have limited access to reading books and textbooks, which can exacerbate these challenges. One study found that on average there is one book for every three students in Tanzania (Mlyakado 2012).

ABOUT Reading Tanzania

An adaptatation of Reading CODE, Reading Tanzania, is a comprehensive readership initiative that aims to improve the learning outcomes of children and youth in underserved communities.  Together with our partner the Children’s Book Project (CBP) we are currently working in 75 schools in collaboration with the various local education offices, school inspectors and Mpwapwa Teacher’s College. 

Through the Reading Tanzania program, a core team of trainers have become qualified to train teachers in effective teaching strategies. Teachers are also being trained in library promotion and management with an aim to encourage children to access books for leisure.

A key objective of the program is to boast the production of high quality books in Kiswahili, the local language spoken in the Kongwa District. The books are used by teachers in their classrooms to enhance children’s learning outcomes as well as cultivating a strong reading culture among them. 

Country Stats

Capital: Dodoma

Population: 49.253 million

Area: 947,300 km2

GDP (per capita): $128.2 billion

Languages: The official languages in Tanzania are Kiswahili and English, yet more than another 120 local languages are spoken across the country. 

Literacy Rate:  87.3%

Literacy Rate for Women: 87.2%

Literacy Rate for Men: 87.4%

Out-of-school Rate: 18.1% of school-aged children do not attend school

Where We Work: Kongwa District, a rural area in the Dodoma Region

Did you Know?

Only 3.5 % of all grade 6 pupils in Tanzania have sole use of a reading textbook. 

The odds of a child carrying a malaria parasite is 44% lower if their mother has a secondary education.

Recent News and Stories

Read the latest news about CODE's efforts in Tanzania.
CODE Exchanges Ideas on Education at International CIES ConferenceMar 13, 2017CODE’s Director of International Programs, Hila Olyan, and Firas Elfarr, Monitoring and Evaluation Coordinator participated in The Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) Annual Meeting in Atl...read full article...
International Development WeekFeb 06, 2017It’s #IDW2017! Time to reflect on why education is so vital and how we must work harder to ensure that ALL children get the opportunity — and the right — to learn. From Feb 5-11 celebrate Canada's contributions to int'l development & encourage all......read full article...
Meet long-time CODE Volunteer, Dr. Alison PreeceDec 05, 2016On this International Volunteer Day we’d like to tip our hats to the legion of expert volunteers who work with CODE throughout the year to help deliver our UNESCO award-winning literacy programming in Africa, the Caribbean, and in Canada. ...read full article...
CODE and the Children’s Book ProjectOct 12, 201625 Years Later - An Enduring Part of Tanzania’s Literacy Landscape. For post-independence, 1960’s Tanzania, prioritizing education was key to its transformation into a free and democratic country. ...read full article...

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