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CODE’s International Literacy Day Annual Donor Reception

An evening of thanks, milestones and the launch of Seeing is Believing 2017!

More than 50 of CODE’s most loyal supporters braved the humidity last week to attend CODE’s annual donor reception - held this year at the beautifully renovated allsaints community space in Sandy Hill. The reception date, Thursday September 8th, was very à propos as it marked the 50th anniversary of UNESCO’s International Literacy Day and the launch of the new Global Education Monitoring Report.

Scott Walter introducing CODE's Donor Reception

Scott Walter, CODE’s Executive Director, hosted the evening and paid special tribute to one of CODE’s most generous donors, William “Bill” Burt. Mr. Burt became involved with CODE in 2007 after taking part in its 2007 Seeing is Believing Tour to Ethiopia. Upon his return from that trip, Bill became a devoted and exceptionally generous CODE supporter. His first order of business? To help CODE get engaging books into the hands of young adults. In 2008, The Burt Award for African Literature was launched in Tanzania to recognise excellent, engaging and culturally relevant books. Burt Award programs for three more African countries soon followed. There are now Burt Award programs for Caribbean Literature and, most recently, First Nations, Inuit and Métis Literature.

Scott Walter with CODE's country partner dignitaries

Poor health prevented Mr. Burt from receiving the CODE Director’s Award but accepting it on his behalf were dignitaries from three countries in which the Burt Award program has made a tremendous impact -- namely Ms. Ukubi Hanfere Mohammed, First Secretary, public diplomacy of the Embassy of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, Mr. Paul James Makelele from the Tanzanian High Commission, and Dr. Sulley Gariba –High Commissioner to Ghana.

Donor Reception introductions

Other attendees included CODE board member Rosamaria Durand, long-time CODE member and donor, Gwynneth Evans, and Afreenish Yusirah –CODE’s new CODE on Campus representative from Carleton University.

The event was also an opportunity for CODE to acknowledge 25 years of partnership with its UNESCO award-winning partners the Children’s Book Project of Tanzania and Associação Progresso of Mozambique.

Dr. Makelele addressing the audienceThe event concluded with the exciting announcement of CODE’s 2017 Seeing is Believing –Ghana tour. His Excellency, Dr. Sulley Gariba, High Commissioner to Ghana, personally extended an invitation to the audience promising participants a very warm welcome to his country. The tour, set to begin on February 15th 2017, will provide participants with the opportunity to visit children and teachers engaged in CODE’s programming in schools in the Ashanti Region of Ghana.

 


Date: 
Monday, September 12, 2016

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Back to school - every parent’s wish

Parents around the world share a common and unwavering truth; a wish for what is best for their children.

Hawa and her mom walking to schoolAs schools open this month, parents in Liberia, as with all of our partner countries, will hope to see their children attend school. However, in a country that emerged from two civil wars back-to-back and most recently survived an Ebola crisis, the need for educating children has never been more important.

As Hawa makes her way to her first day of kindergarten with her mother, it is an exceptionally meaningful moment. Her mother left school in grade 4 never to return. She can barely read and write. She has greater hope for her daughter.

And, given that girls continue to face greater challenges, her teacher, as with all others in our programs, will learn how to improve gender equality. Another critical element that will improve Hawa’s chances for success.

Shoes That Fit book coverCODE will be there with her along the way. As we continue to work with our partners, such as the We-Care Foundation in Liberia, we will ensure that Hawa’s teacher will receive important training. She will learn how to focus more on her students in how she teaches reading and writing.

But as we focus on helping teachers to become better, we also know that they require essential tools, such as books. Books that will excite Hawa and her friends and inspire their learning.

Imagine how important it is for a child’s learning to open a book and see pictures that look like their reality. That tell stories that they can relate to with words that have meaning for them. And in many of CODE’s programs, books that are written in a child’s own language.

Your gift today can help place culturally reflective books into the hands of young children like Hawa; many of whom have never held a book before. You can help create the excitement to learn.

Last year alone, with your help, we were able to help train more than 2,800 teachers and librarians, help provide reading materials to over 1,300 schools, libraries and community centres, and inject over 400,000 books into learning environments in 15 countries around the world. That is impressive!

As this school year begins, I hope you will join me in helping children like Hawa and her teacher get off to a great start – in spite of so many other challenges they face. We hope that as she learns to read and write that, maybe, she will bring her newfound knowledge and abilities home and read to her mother, making her proud.

Allen LeBlanc
Director, Fund Development & Marketing

DONATE TODAY

 


Date: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2016

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News

Consultations on Canada’s international assistance review

Consultations on Canada’s international assistance review

On May 18, 2016, Global Affairs Canada launched a review and public consultations process focused on renewing Canada’s international assistance policy, programming and funding framework.

The primary objective of the review is to determine how best to orient Canada’s international assistance on helping the poorest and most vulnerable populations, and supporting fragile states. The review will consider both the “what” of our international assistance, and the “how” of our approach, including ways to enable greater innovation and effectiveness in our policies, mechanisms and partnerships. The review will result in a set of evidence-based recommendations to Government, informing both Canada’s approach to international assistance and our international implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

All Canadians are invited to participate in this review from May to July 2016.

READ: Canada should make education a core theme in aid policy

For more information on Canada’s international assistance review visit:

 

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Volunteer Voices: Charlie Temple

"I've met so many great people at CODE gatherings who have been able to share their talents and resources in the service of others. Some are retired officials from the Canadian government or UNESCO. Some are business executives. Some manage not-for-profit organizations. Some have built up nest eggs and want to use their funds to do some good.

Me? I'm just a guy who is fascinated by Africa, loves to teach reading and helping others do it, and enjoys writing children's books and helping others do that, too. I know all of us are grateful to CODE for the chance to use a talent or resource that might contribute to something bigger than ourselves.

Just recently I rode out across the dusty landscape of the Kongwa region in Tanzania with Pilli, Marcus, and Ramadhan from the Children's Book Project. At last we reached the most remote primary school I had ever seen.

As Ramadhan and I huddled in the back of a second grade classroom, we were soon in awe of an energetic teacher who led his students in chanting a lovely chorus. But I had to laugh when Ramadhan translated. It was an ode to CODE! The children were singing and dancing a thank you note to CODE for providing books, supporting their library, and giving their teacher new ideas for ways to teach them.

The gratitude was sincere. CODE really had done wonderful things for this school. And those kids? Lively, smart, energetic, motivated, cheerful. Any of them could be the next Kofi Anan, Wangari Matthai, Julius Nyerere, Nelson Madela.

And all of them can be happy citizens, loving mothers and fathers, peaceful citizens who love learning and value justice. Bring on the books! Keep going, CODE! What a privilege it is to be doing this work with you."

Charles (Charlie) Temple is a professor at Hobart & William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY.

 


Date: 
Thursday, April 14, 2016

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Volunteer Voices: Angela Ward

"Volunteering with CODE as a member of the Reading Kenya team is a life-enhancing challenge for me; all my professional experience has been as an educator, beginning as a primary teacher working with indigenous children, and closing my career as a university professor. Reading Kenya draws on all my academic, professional and personal interests.

As an academic, I am concerned that teachers with whom I work, whatever their backgrounds, are respected and encouraged. CODE always carries out its projects with cultural sensitivity, and builds local capacity in literacy teaching.

As a professional, I choose materials and approaches that incorporate local knowledge.  CODE provides books in the languages spoken by the teachers and children who are in schools served by their projects. In Reading Kenya, we have developed close professional and personal ties with the Kenyan academics on our team.

As a mother and grandmother, I dream of a world where all children have access to written materials, to educated and caring teachers, and to a healthy environment. CODE takes a holistic approach to education and adapts to the physical contexts of schooling. The education of girls is a priority.

I am proud to be a volunteer with Reading Kenya because people within CODE, including volunteers, have high ideals that support literacy for children and teachers in regions where there is a high need for improved access to materials and professional education for teachers. I am grateful for this opportunity to continue my work as a teacher educator, and to interact with enthusiastic Kenyan teachers and students."

Angela Ward is ‎Professor Emerita at University of Saskatchewan. Her research focuses on language in cross-cultural contexts; indigenous education; education for social justice and teacher education.

 


Date: 
Tuesday, April 12, 2016

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An Email from Lucy

Internet access and even electricity are hard to come by in the remote places where CODE works. That’s why we were so delighted to receive this email from a teacher involved in one of our programs in Ghana.

Good morning,

I am Lucy, a teacher in Ghana, an assistant coordinator, and a lead trainer for the Reading Ghana program.

I chose to be a teacher after winning the Best Teacher award at a private school where I taught before going to Teacher Training School. The children were so dear to my heart and I taught them with all passion. Parents, teachers and pupils liked me very much due to how I handle children in classroom, helping them to write using my own style and songs.

I was able to organize the children in church for choreography, drama, bible quiz and teaching those who have problems in some topics in primary education. All of this threw more light on my capabilities, so I chose to go to Teacher Training College to help Ghanaian children at large. Before then, I thought I was to become a nurse, but I realized it was just their uniform that was enticing me.

CODE and the Ghana Book Trust are adding more value to teachers and pupils in Ghana. We can boast of new interactive strategies that have removed boredom and decreased absenteeism in Ghanaian children. It has also helped teachers in our communities to know that there is no such thing as a “dull child” when given equal opportunities.

These strategies help the pupils to interact freely with teachers, preparing them for debate and how to talk in public. It has raised the confidence level of teachers and allows them to be posted to any grade level in primary school and junior high school. Also, the teaching and learning materials which we supply to teachers have improved their way of teaching.

To crown it all, the Teacher Training College has agreed to add these strategies to their syllabus, since they have been part of the training and saw how effective it was.

Long live CODE! Long live the Ghanaian Book Trust!

Thank you.

-Lucy

Help teachers like Lucy to inspire a generation.

DONATE TODAY

More about Reading CODE and Reading Ghana.

 


Date: 
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

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Reading Tanzania Promotes Deeper Literacy

CODE expert-volunteer Dr. Charles Temple is a professor of Education at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Last year, he received CODE's Director's Award for Literacy Promotion for his work with CODE over the last 20 years in several African countries providing training for teachers, writers, and illustrators on how to produce good, engaging children's books and use them to better teach reading and writing. He recently travelled to Tanzania to do some monitoring as part of CODE's Reading Tanzania programme.

 

Reading Tanzania Promotes Deeper Literacy

By Dr. Charles Temple

CODE’s Reading Tanzania programme, implemented by its local partner the Children’s Book Project for Tanzania (CBP), is wrapping up in a very different literacy climate than the one in which it started. When the programme began in the Kongwa District three and a half years ago, there were only rumors that other bigger initiatives to improve literacy in the country were on the horizon. The rumors were an understatement! Today, Big Results Now, EQUIP-T (Education Quality Improvement Program—Tanzania), and LANES (Literacy and Numeracy Support) have placed the problem of literacy improvement front and center among educators in Tanzania, and have even introduced a common focus for literacy efforts: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Now just about any educator you talk to in Tanzania can list the “Big 5” as those five aspects of reading are called. With their long and successful experience promoting literacy in Tanzania, CBP has been a key contributor to the current literacy initiatives in Tanzania, as evidenced in the ministry’s acknowledgement of their efforts in the new national literacy curriculum published just last month.

The success of Reading Tanzania in the Kongwa District was on display in a workshop in Kongwa Town this past June, when 75 teachers were invited to show what they had learned in their previous workshop. Groups of teachers led engaging lessons on reading with dictated text (Language-Experience), interactive reading aloud, phonics, fluency, and reading comprehension. The nine trainers, graduates of the CODE workshops for trainers facilitated by myself and Alison Preece from the University of Victoria two years earlier, managed the workshops with confident authority, leavened by lively warm-ups and infectious enthusiasm for their mission.

I was present in the Kongwa workshop to observe and support the trainers. It was wonderful to see these great people we had worked with two years ago leading their own workshop sessions with so much skill and enthusiasm. They were really solid.

With all the current emphasis in Tanzania on literacy, the CBP staff are often called on as national experts. CBP staff and educators trained in CBP projects are consulting with EQUIP-T and LANES. I, along with Marcus Mgbili from CBP, recently went to the Mpwapwa Teacher Training College near Kongwa to visit the six tutors that the CBP project had trained. But four of the tutors were away from campus; because of their advanced knowledge of literacy teaching methods, they had been seconded to the EQUIP-T and LANES projects and sent around the country.

School district officials in Kongwa are enthusiastic about CBP’s efforts. The acting District Education Officer, Mrs. Agatha Nolamnola, and her staff could readily point to CBP’s accomplishments. For instance, in years past she had asked her hundred-plus schools to report any children who could not read. There used to be many, but now, she told me, there are next to none. Also, seven years ago, the Kongwa district was sixth in primary school passing rates out of seven districts in the Dodoma region. Now the district is third in the region, and moving up, thanks in large part to the current Reading Tanzania programme and CBP’s earlier activities in the district.   

Although CBP is an important contributor to current national literacy efforts in Tanzania, Reading Tanzania is more ambitious than national literacy programs that promote the “Big 5” emphases of phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. The “Big 5” are a helpful way to think about basic reading skills, but they don’t go far enough. As future skilled workers, heads of families, and leaders, students need not just to acquire basic literacy skills, but to gain the life-long habit of reading, be inspired to think critically and imaginatively, and learn to work together cooperatively and productively if Tanzania is ever going to see the return on its investment in education that everyone hopes for. Literacy comes in different levels, and people’s levels of productivity, health, income, and civic participation generally rise in proportion to their levels of literacy. Those levels have to be well above basic literacy to make real differences in social benefits.”

Reading Tanzania honors the five emphases adopted by the education ministry, and adds two more: introducing students to literacy, and writing. The programme puts special emphasis on developing reading fluency, higher order comprehension, and language skill (many children in the Kongwa district are not strong speakers of Kiswahili, the language of instruction in primary schools).

Reading Tanzania is further organized around seven principles:

A print-rich environment,

Everyone participates,

Learning makes sense,

Learning takes the students’ prior knowledge and actively expands it to encompass new knowledge,

Students are challenged to think deeply,

All lessons teach language, and

All children and young people are treated with care and respect.

Training in Reading Tanzania is conducted in several workshops where new methods are demonstrated and explained and then practiced by participants under the watchful eyes of the trainers. Participants then try the new methods in their classrooms, where they are observed and coached by Reading Tanzania staff. The project is supported by an 80-page guidebook, Mbinu Saba. Teachers use explicit performance standards to focus their efforts toward improvement, and the project has special monitoring tools and pupil assessment instruments that are used both to keep activities on track and to measure success. 

Read more about CODE's work in Tanzania


Date: 
Friday, July 17, 2015

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News

Olepolos

By Hila Olyan, Programme Manager

“Where do you live?” I ask Vincent.

“Near the shops,” he tells me.

“That’s a long way,” I respond, “do you walk?”

“No,” says Vincent, but he smiles.

“Then how do you get here?” I pry.

“I run.”

Vincent is six years old and a Standard (grade) one student at Olepolos Primary School in Kajiado county, Kenya.  He treks several kilometres to school every day.  Despite what seemed to me to be a very long, rutted drive to the school, Olepolos is actually considered one of the more cosmopolitan schools to participate in the Reading Kenya Project.  Children there typically walk about five kilometers to attend classes but, during what has been a very wet and rainy May, even the ‘short’ distances are no easy feat. 

                           Vincent

“Why do you like school?” I ask him.  Soila, one of our project officers, is helping me translate.  (The introduction alone has exhausted my knowledge of Kiswahili and Vincent can answer more clearly in Maa, the local language in this region).  It turns out he wants to learn Kiswahili and math.  His mother, who owns a small kiosk and his father, a local butcher, have told him those are important skills.  Vincent agrees... except that he wants to be a teacher one day. 

Next up is Deborah.  A classmate of Vincent’s, she is nine years old.  Like many students in Kajiado county, her walk to school is longer so she needed a few more years before making the trip herself.

Deborah and I sit down under a tree.  She’s much shyer than Vincent, so I have to strain to hear her excited whispers.  She tells me that she loves English class and that she has read two books at the new library. 

Mariamu Goes Shopping  is her favorite.  She has also read one about Aisha and Mambo.  I’m not sure who they are but I can tell from her expression that she obviously liked that book too.   I’m pleased to see that even the Standard one students are making use of the library and the new books provided through the Reading Kenya.

“No, the one with the boy and the monkey!”  Now Vincent is interrupting us to make sure I know which book is his favorite. 

Their teacher brought a box of books from the library the previous week and each student picked out a few to read.  Book boxes are one of the strategies we often use with the early grades.  It provides the teacher with the opportunity to strategically select appropriate books for her class and it makes it easier to keep an eye on all of the students. 

When the project started there wasn’t a single story book to be found at Olepolos Primary School.  Over the past year,  CODE and its local partner, the National Book Development Council of Kenya,  have provided more than 2,000 new books to the school (and to 24 other schools in Kajiado county as well).  We’ve also trained one of their teachers as well as the head teacher on the basics of library management.  In return, the parents have turned an empty class room into a small library.  They’ve built shelves, while we are providing tables and chairs and a few mats where children can sit and read. 

Deborah

The library is still small, but it’s a start.  The kids are embracing it, the teachers are using it, and the parents are supporting it.  It’s the most you can ask for as a programme officer.

“Next time,” I say to Vincent and Deborah, “we’re going to the library and you two are going to read to me.”

They giggle.

They think I’m joking.  I’m not.  I can’t wait to get back there to see just how many books they’ve read.

 

CODE Programme Manager Hila Olyan is currently in Kajiado, Kenya, to observe teacher training and visit program school as part of Reading Kenya. This project is made possible thanks to funding from the Government of Canada through the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development.

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News

Asante (thank you)

by Hila Olyan, Programme Manager

Moses, the grade 1 teacher at Lenchani Primary School,  can hardly keep his students at their desks as their hands fly into the air ready to answer questions about the story they are reading in their English class.

“Hyena, Dog and Hare are going to a party,” he reads.  “What can you expect to find at a party?”

“Chapati!” (an aunleavened flatbread), calls out one child.

“Nyama!” (meat), says the next.

“Music...friends... popcorn...chairs...family.”  Every kid wants a chance to answer.

We’ve only read the first page and already every student in the classroom is captivated.  Every kid is excited about reading.

As a Programme Manager, the single most rewarding part of my job is visiting the field.   Seeing our project schools benefit from the training we are providing to teachers and the books we are delivering to libraries, is not only gratifying but motivating.  How can we make this program better?  How can we be even more efficient with our resources? 

There is no shortage of factors that complicate the project.  The distance between schools in the area makes the round-trip visit an event in itself.  The rainy season has brought oppressive rainfall and flooding to the region.  Not even gumboots and our 4 by 4 vehicle can get us to some of the schools in the interior.

Ma, the language of the Maasai people (who are predominant in Kajiado where we work,) is a further obstacle.  Being a tonal language, there is not yet an agreed upon orthography for putting words into print. Books in Ma are few and far between but we are doing our best to improve the situation.  Just two weeks ago, Dr. Adelheid Bwire, a Kenyan literacy specialist, met with a small group of our teachers to start the long process of producing manuscripts that we can turn into books over the course of Reading Kenya.

Transport and language notwithstanding, the challenges don’t stop there. Resources are limited (I’m yet to see a full box of crayons or an extra pencil in a Kajiado classroom), children are often hungry, formalized education isn’t something that their parents experienced.  For many students, they will be the first (or at least the first generation) in their families to read and write.

“Have you ever been to a party?” Moses asks? “Why do you think they are going to a party?”

“Birthday?”

“Holiday!”

“Wedding!”

Despite the odds, Moses’ grade one class is not only learning basic literacy but as a newly trained Reading Kenya teacher he is practicing child-centered learning approaches designed to promote critical thinking.  That’s the goal of our project: to improve the learning outcomes of girls and boys in Kajiado, Kenya. 

Through teacher and librarian training, book procurement and community involvement, CODE is addressing the lack of access to high quality education in the public primary schools in Kenya.

From the back of the grade one class, I can see a crate of books just waiting to be read.  Looking down at my list of teachers coming for the second training, I can see Moses’ name on the list.  He’s only going to get better from here. 

“Teacher, teacher, pick me!!” 

We’ve got a long way to go still, and many more schools to cover, but it’s been a good day.  Just ask the grade one class.  They are loving every minute of it.

CODE Programme Manager Hila Olyan is currently in Kajiado, Kenya, to observe teacher training and visit program school as part of Reading Kenya. This project is made possible thanks to funding from the Government of Canada through the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development.